2019 - 2020 Ruth K. Broad Foundation Seminars

The Ruth K. Broad Foundation Seminar Series on Neurobiology and Disease at Duke University seeks to promote Translational Neuroscience by facilitating the interactions of fundamental and clinical neuroscientists. Translational Neuroscience applies insights gained through fundamental research on brain structure and function to develop novel pharmacological, surgical, and behavioral therapies of these diseases. This seminar series will feature national and international neuroscientists of the highest caliber. Neuroscientists from Duke and other academic institutions, government, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology institutions throughout the region are welcome to attend.

To facilitate access of an even broader audience, the seminars will be recorded, digitized, and posted on this web site, thereby giving neuroscientists worldwide access to this valuable resource. This lectureship series is made possible by the generous support of the Ruth K. and Shepard Broad Biomedical Research Foundation.

2018 - 2019 Broad Seminars

2017 - 2018 Broad Seminars

2016 - 2017 Broad Seminars

Li-Huei Tsai

January 14, 2020

Our laboratory is interested in elucidating the pathogenic mechanisms underlying neurological disorders that impact learning and memory. We take multidisciplinary, network-level approaches to decipher the molecular, cellular, and circuit basis of neurodegenerative disorders.

Andrea Soranno

February 4, 2020

The Soranno lab combines single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and concepts from polymer physics to investigate intrinsically disordered proteins and develop innovative methods to study macromolecular conformations and dynamics within cells and in membraneless organelles.

Haruo Kasai

February 11, 2020

Neuronal circuits made by synapses in the brain enable learning, memory, perception, emotion, and their impairment results in various mental disorders. We perform research that extensively utilize microscopic methods to observe cellular and molecular events deep within the brain, and which allow labeling of potentiated synapses and optical manipulation of synapses and circuits. We have shown that cerebral spine synapses undergo rapid enlargement during potentiation in the hippocampus, neocortex and basal ganglia. Such dynamic synaptic motilities are the sites of endogenous neuromodulation, therapeutic agents and addictive drugs. Moreover, the dynamic nature of synapses has allowed us to construct new optical and molecular probes for a better understanding of learning and cognition and their impairments.

Emery Brown

March 4, 2020 (Wednesday)

Dr. Brown is an anesthesiologist-statistician whose experimental research has made important contributions towards understanding the neuroscience of how anesthetics act in the brain to create the states of general anesthesia. In his statistics research he has developed signal processing algorithms to solve important data analysis challenges in neuroscience.