Informal and Student Seminars

The Student Seminar Series meets at noon on select Wednesdays throughout the academic year. Second-year students present papers from recent literature. Each student is expected to present two 30-minute presentations during their second year. Presentations are followed by lively discussion, pizza lunch and a closed session with the student presenter and two faculty.

Upcoming Seminars

Steve Marino
Hybrid Brain-Tissue Based Model to Study the Role of Infiltrating Monocytes in Late-Stage Huntington's Disease
March 25, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Steven Marinero is interested in the roles microglia and infiltrating monocytes play during neurodegeneration. His research involves the use of biolistic transfection of gene constructs into organotypic slices. He use this assay to study how microglia and infiltrating monocytes affect the rate of neurodegeneration with the goal of therapeutically targeting these cells.
Neurobiology Student Seminar
March 27, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Tim Darlington and Patrick Mayo are in the Lisberger Lab.
Nagappan and Fleming
Neurobiology Student Seminar
April 3, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Shiva Nagappan is in the Franks Lab and Elizabeth Fleming is in the Hull Lab.
Neurobiology Student Seminar
April 10, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Katie Baldwin is in the Eroglu Lab.
Neurobiology Student Seminar
April 17, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Thuy Hua and Luping Yin are both in the Wang Lab.
Neurobiology Student Seminar
April 24, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Jinghao Lu is in the Wang Lab and Mor Ben-Tov is in the Mooney Lab.
Neurobiology Student Seminar
May 1, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Neil Gallagher is in the Dzirasa Lab and Valerie Michael is in the Mooney Lab.
Systems biology approaches to the study of Huntington¿s disease and ALS
May 3, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm
Discoveries in human genetics have allowed investigators to make significant progress in understanding the underlying cellular mechanisms that are disrupted by these mutations and to develop rational therapeutics. The research in the Thompson lab has largely focused on understanding pathogenic mechanisms for neurodegenerative disease and FGFR3-associated cancers in order to identify and validate novel therapeutic targets for treatment of these diseases. Lunch and pre-seminar reception at 12:30 PM Host: Dr. Al La Spada Please email rosa.persaud@duke.edu for meeting requests

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