Students

Divya Subramanian

Program Start Year:
2015
Mentor:
Marc Sommer
Faculty lab
919-681-1176
I am broadly interested in a computational and circuit-level understanding of sensorimotor systems. Specifically, I am interested in how motor information interacts with sensory processing to drive perception and behavior.

Sam Brudner

Program Start Year:
2014
Mentor:
Richard Mooney
Faculty lab
Email address: samuel.brudner@duke.edu
919-684-5133
I graduated from Yale College in 2012 with a bachelor's degree in cognitive science. There, I completed a senior project, advised by Brian Scholl, that investigated a relationship between eye movements and memory. I have also conducted psychology research with Daniel Richardson at University College London, and with Marcia Johnson at Yale. Beyond many interests within psychology, I enjoy music and dance -- and I have studied and performed traditional and contemporary West African dance.

Timothy Darlington

Program Start Year:
2014
Mentor:
Stephen Lisberger
Faculty lab
919-684-1162
I'm currently interested in understanding how sensorimotor circuits integrate past experience with current sensory information to guide behavior. My project is investigating this in the context of target-direction estimation for smooth pursuit eye movements in nonhuman primates.

Elizabeth Fleming

Program Start Year:
2014
Mentor:
Court Hull
Faculty lab
919-660-0990
I am interested in studying how sensorimotor information is encoded in the cerebellar cortex and how this level of processing is impacted by neuromodulation.

Jinghao Lu

Program Start Year:
2014
Mentor:
Fan Wang
Email address: jinghao.lu@duke.edu
919-684-6091
I am interested in studying network level neural dynamics, dissecting sensory information pathways, and modeling simple neural circuits with cortical computing algorithms. Ultimately, I hope to combine quantitative neural modeling approaches, various dimensional experiment techniques, and applications based on neural theories to develop a systematic understanding of how the brain works, why it works, and whether it can be improved.