Informal and Student Seminars

The Student Seminar Series meets at noon on select Wednesdays throughout the academic year. Second-year students present papers from recent literature. Each student is expected to present two 30-minute presentations during their second year. Presentations are followed by lively discussion, pizza lunch and a closed session with the student presenter and two faculty.

Upcoming Seminars

Ashley and Jeff
Neurobiology Student Seminar
April 4, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Ashley Wilson is a graduate student in the Neurobiology Graduate Training Program and a member of the Glickfeld lab. She is interested in how the brain processes sensory information and uses that information for perception and behavior. Using the mouse visual system,she is studying connectivity and patterns of activity in cortex during perceptual tasks. Her hope is to resolve some of the mechanisms that govern the neural networks necessary for these tasks and ultimately relate them to sensory perception in general. Jeff Mohl is a graduate student in the Neurobiology Graduate Training Program...
Xiaoyang and Jon
Neurobiology Student Seminar
April 11, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Xioyang Yao is a graduate student in the Neurobiology Graduate Training Program and a member of the Field lab. She is interested in understanding sensory coding strategies of neural networks and how these algorithms could be applied to machine intelligence. Jon Cafaro is a postdoc in the Field lab.
Taylor and Albert
Neurobiology Student Seminar
April 18, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Taylor is a graduate student in the Neurobiology Graduate Training Program and a member of the Hull lab. He is interested in exploring the interconnection between neural & glial circuitry and, ultimately, their synergistic role in controlling behavior. Albert is a graduate student in the Cell & Molecular Biology program and the Molecular Genetics and Microbiology program. He is a member of the Yan lab and is studying the molecular mechanisms behind glial cell development in Caenorhabditis elegans.
Chris and Shawn
Neurobiology Student Seminar
April 25, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Chris is a graduate student in the Neurobiology Graduate Training Program and a member of the Kay lab. He is interested in cell surface and secreted molecular cues which guide the development of neural circuits in the retina. Additionally, he want to understand the signaling pathways downstream of these cues that ultimately activate the cytoskeleton. Shawn is a graduate student in the Neurobiology Graduate Training Program and a member of the Groh lab. He is interested in how interactions between individual neurons and neural systems shape perception and cognition. Currently, he's...
Claire and Martin
Neurobiology Student Seminar
May 2, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Claire is postdoc in the Matsunami lab. Her research is focused on the description of olfaction process at the atomic level. She builds a virtual olfactory system by means of computational and microbiology approaches in order to simulate the neuronal mechanism of the perception of smell. Martin is a postdoc in the Sommer lab. He is currently working on discovering which viral vectors are best suited for transduction of exogenous genes into select neuronal populations. His goal is to use optogenetics to control the activity of desired neuronal populations in awake and behaving non-human...
Neurobiology Student Seminar
May 9, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Patrick is a senior research associate in the Lisberger Lab. Jonna is a graduate student in the Neurobiology Graduate Training Program and a member of the Mooney lab. He is interested in combining an array of powerful tools including calcium imaging, electrophysiology, and viral manipulations of brain circuits in order to elucidate how learning manifests at a circuit-wide level.
Neurobiology Student Seminar
May 16, 2018 -
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Katie is a postdoc in the Wang lab and the Mooney Lab. Shataakshi is a graduate student in the Neurobiology Graduate Training Program and a member of the Soderling lab. She is interested in the regulation of synapse development, function, and plasticity.

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