Neurobiology Seminar Program

Neurobiology sponsors seminars on Tuesdays at noon in 103 Bryan Research. The Neurobiology Invited Seminar Series features both established and up-and-coming researchers and professors from around the world. This program is created by a committee of students, postdocs and faculty. The seminar program guides the materials for a student journal club that reads the upcoming speaker’s papers in advance and meets to discuss the week before the seminar. After the seminar, students and postdocs are invited to have lunch with the speaker.

Upcoming Seminars

Self-tuning neurons and firing rate homeostasis
December 1, 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Duke Neurobiology welcomes neuroscientist Gina Turrigiano, Professor of Biology at Brandeis University. Contact d.shipman@duke.edu for connection details. Partial abstract: Neocortical networks must generate and maintain stable activity patterns despite perturbations induced by learning and experience- dependent plasticity, and this stability must be maintained across distinct behavioral states with very different sensory drive and modulatory tone. There is abundant theoretical and experimental evidence that network stability is achieved through homeostatic plasticity mechanisms that adjust...
Molecular Mechanisms of Neural Circuit Assembly
December 8, 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Duke Neurobiology welcomes neuroscientist Liqun Luo, PhD, Ann and Bill Swindells Professor of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University. Contact d.shipman@duke.edu for connection details. Abstract: The human brain contains ~1011 neurons, making >1014 synaptic connections that enable us to sense, think, remember, and act. How is this vast number of neurons organized into circuits to process information? How are these circuits correctly assembled during development? We use model neural circuits in the less numerically complex brains of the fruit fly (~105 neurons) and mouse (~108...
Cerebellar control of reaching movements
December 15, 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Duke Neurobiology welcomes Abigail Person, Associate Professor of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Contact d.shipman@duke.edu for connection details. Abstract: The cerebellum is well appreciated to impart speed, smoothness, and precision to skilled movements such as reaching. How these functions are executed by the final output stage of the cerebellum, the cerebellar nuclei, remains unknown. In this talk, I will discuss our data identifying a causal relationship between cerebellar output and mouse reach kinematics and show how that relationship is...
Neurobiology Invited Seminar
January 5, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Neurobiology welcomes Roy Sillitoe, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology and of Neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine. Please contact d.shipman@duke.edu for connection details.
Neurobiology Invited Seminar
January 12, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Duke Neurobiology welcomes Gwyneth Card, PhD, Group Leader at HHMI Janelia Research Campus. Please email d.shipman@duke.edu for connection details.
Ruth K. Broad Foundation Seminar
January 19, 2021 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Duke Neurobiology welcomes Reza Shadmehr, PhD, Professor of Biomedical Engineering and of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University. Please email d.shipman@duke.edu for connection details.