Neurobiology Seminar Program

Neurobiology sponsors seminars on Tuesdays at noon in 103 Bryan Research. The Neurobiology Invited Seminar Series features both established and up-and-coming researchers and professors from around the world. This program is created by a committee of students, postdocs and faculty. The seminar program guides the materials for a student journal club that reads the upcoming speaker’s papers in advance and meets to discuss the week before the seminar. After the seminar, students and postdocs are invited to have lunch with the speaker.

Upcoming Seminars

Nirao Shah
Neural control of sex differences in social behaviors
April 16, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
All sexually reproducing animals exhibit innate displays of sexually dimorphic behaviors such as mating or territoriality that are sensitive to social context and experience. What neural mechanisms encode such developmentally wired behaviors that are nevertheless modifiable by experience? Despite their fundamental importance to social interactions in health and neuro-psychiatric disorders, the molecular and neural networks underlying sex differences in behaviors remain poorly understood. To tackle this long-standing problem, we leverage the fact that sex hormones regulate sexual...
Neurobiology Invited Seminar Series
April 23, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Dr. Arenkiel is a member of the faculty at the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital. He received his bachelor's degree from St. Cloud State University in Minnesota and his doctoral degree from the University of Utah in the laboratory of Nobel Laureate Dr. Mario Capecchi, where he investigated the developmental genetic programs that function to pattern the embryonic nervous system. Dr. Arenkiel later joined the laboratory of Dr. Lawrence Katz at Duke University as a Howard Hughes postdoctoral fellow, where he investigated the neural...
Neurobiology Invited Seminar Series
April 30, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Dr. Schaefer is an Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Psychiatry and a Seaver Fellow at the Friedman Brain Institute at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She did her graduate studies at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, the Charité University Berlin and The Rockefeller University in New York. In the fall of 2004 she joined Dr. Paul Greengard's Laboratory at The Rockefeller University where she completed her postdoctoral studies and was promoted to Research Associate in 2007 and Senior Research Associate in 2009. She joined the Friedman Brain Institute at Mount Sinai School of...
The Ruth K. Broad Foundation Seminar Series on Neurobiology and Disease
May 7, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Research in my lab focuses on the general question of how experience acts on the nervous system to shape behavior. Our goal is to account for learning by understanding the sensory stimuli that drive change, how and where those stimuli are represented in patterns of neural activity, and how those patterns act to modify behavior. We hope both to reveal general learning mechanisms, and to understand how variations in those mechanisms give rise to individual differences in behavior. Hence, we are interested in how the nervous system changes over the course of development to give rise to '...
Neurobiology Invited Seminar Series
May 14, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
The goal of our laboratory is to reveal the neural basis of perception. More specifically, we want to understand exactly how cortical microcircuits process sensory information to drive behavior. While decades of research have carefully outlined how individual neurons extract specific features from the sensory environment, the cellular and synaptic mechanisms that permit ensembles of cortical neurons to actually process sensory information and generate perceptions are largely unknown.
Neurobiology Invited Seminar Series
May 21, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Stress and pain-induced behavior is controlled by specific neurotransmitters and their signaling partners in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Many of these signals are conveyed through activation of neuropeptide and monoamine receptor systems. These receptors are seven transmembrane spanning G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR, also called 7 transmembrane receptors) and they engage a variety of signaling cascades following neurotransmitter release and receptor binding. To expand our knowledge of the inner workings of the brain and to identify treatments for psychiatric diseases, the...
Mark Andermann
Larry Katz Memorial Lecture
May 28, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
The Andermann Lab seeks to understand how the needs of the body determine which sensory cues are attended to, learned, and remembered. In particular, they are investigating how natural and experimentally induced states of hunger modulate neural representations of food cues, and the consequences for obesity, binge eating, and other eating disorders. Previous studies support a simple model for hunger-dependent processing of food cues: During states of satiety, food cue information enters sensory neocortex but may not flow to cortical areas involved in selective processing of motivationally...
The Ruth K. Broad Foundation Seminar Series on Neurobiology and Disease
June 4, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
The lab's goal is to understand the interplay of membrane-bound organelles, cytoskeletal structure, and metabolism as it relates to the organization and function of neurons, and the cells they interact with. On a small scale, we are interested in mapping out the spatial organization, stoichiometry, and dynamics of proteins as they interact with each other and with different parts of the cell. On a larger scale, we are trying to decipher how complex cellular behaviors arise, including cell crawling, polarization, cell-cell contact, cytokinesis, cell fate determination, viral budding, and...

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